Triangle Shawl Crochet Design

Triangle Shawl Crochet Design

by Alison Stapleton

Shapes

Wraps are rectangles and shawls are triangles. This is the general consensus. You can get semi-circle wraps as well. But in this post I’m discussing the structure of crocheted triangles.

Triangles

A triangle has three sides and three corners. Typically there is one long side and two shorter sides both the same length. This is known as a scalene triangle and is the most popular shape for triangle shawls.

Crochet Designs for Triangle Shawls

If you are making a shawl in a solid piece as opposed to granny squares or other motive shapes then it will be made in one piece.

The starting point sets the stage for the design and there are only a few ways to construct a triangle shawl in crochet.

Any type of stripe or pattern stitch can be used but the way the shawl grows will be the same.


Point Up – Horizontal

This is a popular method where you work from the bottom point and go up in rows which increase each row. In this design you can stop or keep going once the size is suitable.

An example of this design is the Lancashire Shawl.


Wide Top Down – Horizontal

In this design the full-width of the top side is set, typically as a chain length, and cannot be adjusted later. Here you work rows down towards the point. Each row is shorter than the previous as you decrease at the start and end of each row.

Here you work rows down towards the point. Each row is shorter than the previous as you decrease at the start and end of each row.

 


Center Top to Sides – Both Diagonal

In this design you start at the center top and make a triangle immediately. This can be seen in the half granny style. Each row adds to the sides and the point grows downwards.

 

The center top to sides design can be adjusted when the size is reached or you can continue to add more rows.

The Cumbria Shawl is a good example of this design.

 


Left to Right – Vertical

In this design you start at the left side and work vertical rows towards the right side. Which increases on one side only and the top side remains the same. At the

At the point you start to decrease on the lower side again and the rows get shorter.

The image below is the first half of the shawl as the rows grow vertically towards the point. When I’ve finished it I’ll get the completed image in here for you.


Centre to Sides – Vertical

Here the base chain is from the top center to the point. You work first the left side to the side point and then the right side to the side point. Care needs to be taken to get both sides the same.

Each row is vertically from the center chain and reduces at the bottom whilst keeping the top edge straight.

In this design the depth of the shawl is determined at the start but you can make the width wider if you do a shallower decrease.

Your Choice

All shawl designs have their pros and cons. Personally, I like the point up and the center top to side methods as the triangle shape it set from the start.

It is a personal choice and the stitch pattern and the colour choices used will help determine the type of design you should choose.

Alison

 


 

 

Carleton iPad Cover – Crochet Pattern

Carleton iPad Cover – Crochet Pattern

by Alison Stapleton

Tech Essentials

I’ve had an iPad for several years now and I’ve been frustrated with the big bulky and clunky hard cases sold in the Apple Store. They are not neat and they make the whole item seem bigger than it is.

If the iPad designers made such a sleek and smooth piece of kit why would you want to hide it all in a nasty plastic flap thingy?

You are probably like me and you need the information and connectivity the Ipad gives without the bulk of junky covers.

I take my iPad with me most days and slip it into my bag. In fact these days I don’t buy a handbag or tote that will not fit my IPad.

I had worked on several prototype designs made in crochet for my IPad cover but they all had the same problem that the sleek pad would just slip right out.

This was not good.

Carleton Nip and Tuck iPad Cover

This new design is based on the simple pillow case method where the case is snug (nip) and then you ease the inner flap (tuck) over the end so the iPad will not slide out.

Our Carleton iPad Crochet Cover has no external flaps or buttons to catch on other things.

 

No matter who you are or how you crochet you will likely have an iPad. If you are a crocheter you can make this easy breezy iPad cover in less than three hours.

And if you don’t have an iPad I bet your grandkids do.

 


Materials

Made from Vanna’s Choice by Lion Brand or any other 4 weight yarn.

2 x 50g balls, one in black and one in pink.

Size 5.25mm crochet hook or the hook required to match the gauge.

Your label (optional)

Yarn needle to sew in ends.

Stitch marker.


Gauge

15 stitches and 12 rows to 4″ x 4″ (10cm x 10cm).


Measurements

Width 17cm, height 23cm.

Note: When resting and by that I mean when the iPad is not in the cover, the cover is slightly smaller than the actual iPad.


Pattern Notes

This cover is worked in the round and after the first row the work spirals up and is not round by round. There is no seam.

The fit is a snug fit to grip the iPad the cover will stretch a little as you insert the iPad this is normal.

Colour choices

The pattern here is for the black/pink version but I am also showing you the gold/cream colourway.  When you use colour in crochet it changes the feel of the item.

The black/pink is vibrant and businesslike and the gold/cream is lighter and has more whimsey.

 


Stitches used

Chain – ch.

Slip stitch – sl st.

Single crochet – sc.

Learn more about the five basic crochet stitches you need to know.


Pattern

Please note: This pattern will be free for just over a week and then be available as a PDF download for a nominal fee.

Body

Foundation chain: With black ch 24.

Rnd 1: Ch 1 (as 1st st), 1 sc in every chain to end (24 sts), 2 sc into same st (as side corner), 1 sc into every st up the other side, 2 sc into same st, (52 sts). Do not join with sl st. Place a stitch marker into next st.

Rnd 2: Immediately make the next st into the first st of rnd 1 and continue in a spiral from here.

Work until completed 12 rnds and end at stitch marker side. Leave black (do not cut),

Join pink, work 1 sl st into next 2 sts then continue in sc, complete one rnd, leave pink, pick up black and work 1 sc into each of the sl sts from the rnd below and then continue.

From this point you will have two spirals (one pink and one black) with two thread in use. Continue until you have five pink and five black rnds completed. End at the stitch marker side. With black make 1 sl st into the next 2 sts. Cut black and fasten off.

With pink continue and work every st and go over the 2 black sl sts with sc all the way round. Continue spiral in pink for twelve more rnds. End at stitch marker side. Turn.

Inner flap

Row 1: 1 ch (as 1st st), 1 sc into next 24 sts, turn (25 sts).

Row 2-8: Repeat row 1. Fasten off.


Finishing

Turn item inside out. Fold flap down and neatly sew down both sides making sure not to go through to the front. Weave in ends. Turn right side out.

Sew on your label at the right hand side bottom 1cm in from the corner (optional).


 

 



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Crochet Bag Patterns

Crochet Bag Patterns

 by Alison Stapleton

Crochet bags are fun and easy to make. There are many types of bags and most can be made in crochet. The beauty of these designs is that they usually can be made in a day or two.

Start now and have a new bag each season (that’s four this year) or go ahead and craft yourself one for each month.

Crochet bags do not last forever and depending on the yarns you use they can get worn, fluff or pill easily.

Take care to choose natural fibres like cotton or wool  or select tough acrylics.

Where to put your crochet bags when out and about

Never chuck a crochet bag (or any bag for that matter) onto the floor.  Rather leave it hanging on the back of your chair

In a restaurant or coffee shop

Tuck your bag behind your back on the chair in a restaurant or coffee shop.

Only place spectacular evening bags on the dining table.

You can get a handy dandy portable handbag hook and dangle your bag stylishly from the table edge.

On the bus, train or subway

Always have your bag on your knee. Don’t leave it on the seat next to you (this attracts grab-and-runs). Not on the floor.

If your commute is very dirty put you crochet bag into a see-though plastic bag for travelling in busy public places.

In the cloakroom

Hang it on the hook or knob behind the door. Never place your crochet bag on top of the cistern. Really?

Never ever on the floor. Tuck it under your arm as you hover.

At the basin, if you have to put it on the counter, place some paper towels down first.

You never know what lurks in public places.


Care for your crochet bag

You have spent many hours making your crochet bag so you need to care for it to extend its longevity.

When bags like this get dirty or stained it is hard to clean them so the best way is to protect them beforehand.

Any bag you make and use says something about you. You want you crochet bags to be beautiful for a long time so take care and enjoy using your hand crafted bags.


Bag patterns coming soon

These bag patterns will be coming soon. I will add them as soon as I can.

The patterns are free for a few days and then cost $2 for a PDF download. Check back often to pick up your free bag patterns.

There are more free patterns here.

 



Own Your Niche

Own Your Niche

by Alison Stapleton

Own Your Niche

Your niche is the special segment in your industry that you know well and where you are skilled.

In the large world of craft, crochet is a section of craft. Hats are a section of crochet in crafts. Baby hats are a section within hats in crochet and in crafts, and writing patterns for baby hats, in hats, in crochet, in crafts is a niche.

Your niche is the place where you are good and can do, whatever it is. You could call it a passion and if you can – then you know.

Millions of people craft and thousands of them crochet. Many individuals make hats, some folks make baby hats and a few of them write patterns for baby crochet hats.

Maybe you make crochet baby booties and that is your niche. Perhaps you create amigurumi animals and that is your niche. Or you produce cotton bohemian tops and that is your niche.

Your niche is not only the actual item it can be the type of crochet

You may be a specialist in tunisian crochet, Irish crochet or filet crochet. Perhaps you only work on freeform crochet like hyperbolic crochet and the Mobius. These are examples of techniques that could be your niche and you may make various items within these segments.

Your niche is the thin area within your main industry where you excel.

How to find your niche

Look at your stash

Do you have many yarns? What thickness of wool and cottons do you have? Only thin or only chunky yarns? Only natural fibres or some acrylics?

What is your colour palette? Do you mainly have brights, darks or pastels. Or maybe only neutrals? Which colours appeal to you? Are you a fan of variegated yarns?

My stash is very different to your stash and your stash will be different again to the next woman. Individuality is shown by the type of yarn and colour combinations in your stash.

What do you usually make when you crochet?

Blankets, scarves, doilies, kids stuff, bags or what?

What about size? Is your work often in little projects that can be finished in a day or big afghans that take a month to complete or are they something in between?

How about the methods you use. Do you work top-down so you never have to sew seams? Do you do circles and work in-the-round, or squares like granny squares or log cabin? Are you likely to create projects with tonal stripes like light blue, mid blue and dark blue or color blocks? Do you love intricate stitch patterns or plain repetitive stitches?

By a simple consideration of what you normally buy in yarns (as shown by your stash) and what you usually make (in item) and the techniques your employ all suggest the direction of your niche.

Your niche

If you can say “I make baby hats in natural cotton which I market online,” or “I specialize in lacy wedding shawls which I sell to local bridal boutiques,” then that is your niche.

Bear in mind that you niche may be wide for example, if you crochet kids fun clothing in primary acrylics, then that is your niche..

Your niche does not have to be narrow but it typically becomes so. Over the years you may slip into making a certain thing in a particular yarn with the same hook for a definite market.

Embrace your style and hone your skills to become the best within your niche.

Take ownership and own your niche.


Share Your Crochet Stories and Yarns

Share Your Crochet Stories and Yarns

by Alison Stapleton

Share Your Crochet Stories and Yarns-page-001 (1)Your invitation to share

I invite you to share your stories and yarns about how you got into crochet, and how crochet has saved your life, changed your life or improved it in some way.

And we want to hear about how you use crochet as a form of income.

You can read stories about the Doll’s House Maker and his Christmas story, and The Sewing Lady and other stories.

We invite you to share your stories

This is to inspire others to make their life better through crochet.

Back in the day people would sit around the campfire after dark and share their stories. Storytelling has been part of the human experience for centuries.

Today we don’t have a campfire but we have the Internet and website to read our stories from.

I am gathering together stories and yarns that can inspire others to pick up their hook and start crocheting towards health, wealth and a better life.

Do you have a story about:

  • How crochet changed your life?
  • How crochet improved your life?
  • How crochet brought some sanity and system to your life?
  • How you enjoy making things with crochet?
  • The feeling of your first sale?
  • Your “Hook Day” story

Share your stories with us and we will print them on our blog.

You may add your email address and web address if you wish or not (this is optiona)l. You can change your name or use a pen name if you like. We don’t mind.

We just want to hear your stories and yarns about crochet.

Storytelling fosters belonging

Many cultures made fairy tales like Cinderella and Hansel and Gretel to tell of the things that happened in their history.

These were everyday things and add to the family knowledge and foster a feeling of belonging.

If you want to belong then being part of the crochet story is a way to start.

Repetition is part of the story of crochet both as in the repetition of stitches and the repetition of the stories.

Here is a short video from The Gothamist, about the woman in New York City who wanted a seat on the subway for her crochet and yarn and argued hard to keep it from a man who wanted to sit down. She was passionate about keeping the space for her yarn.

Stories coming soon

The story about woman who was not allowed to take her crochet hook on a plane because it was thought of as a weapon, and how she overcame it in a unique way.

How to contact us

If you would like to contribute write to us in the form below. All stories will be read and respected.


[contact-form to=’alison@oldenglishcreations.com’ subject=’I would like to share my story’][contact-field label=’Name’ type=’name’ required=’1’/][contact-field label=’Email’ type=’email’ required=’1’/][contact-field label=’Website’ type=’url’/][contact-field label=’Comment’ type=’textarea’ required=’1’/][/contact-form]

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Know Your Dream Customer

Know Your Dream Customer

by Alison Stapleton

You start to crochet the day you pick up your first hook (the day before that you had never held a hook and knew not of this captivating craft).

From that day onwards (we shall call it Hook Day) you can say you are a crocheter to some degree.

Although it may take weeks, months, years (or never) for you to turn your crocheting into a micro-business.

When you decide to set up in a crochet business there are many things to think about before you get-going and start to sell, because selling something is what being in business is all about.

You may produce crocheted goodies, designs or your skills or a combination of these options. It depends on you and what interests you enough to keep you going through the early tough days of your business.

Your Dream Customer

I used to think that my dream customer was anyone who bought my stuff. Maybe you think this too, but take that thought another step forward and tune into who exactly your dream customer is and could be.

If you know who your dream customer is, it is one way to decide on the thrust of your creative and promotional effort. This is important as we, as crocheters, only have so much creative effort each day and it is best not to waste it.

They say you can make more money but not more time and this is very true for creative types which I’m sure you are as you are reading this article.

You need to work out whether you will sell:

  • Crochet supplies bought wholesale
  • Your handmade crochet goods
  • Your own crochet patterns 
  • Crochet classes that you teach
  • Crochet books and videos
  • Kits for beginners with a hook, yarn and pattern
  • Other – because you never know

If you are going to sell your hand-made crochet goods like hats and scarves you can sell them:

  • By word of mouth and thus in your local neighbourhood only.
  • At a local shop (kids shop or kitchen store for example) – locally
  • At craft fairs – locally and regionally
  • Through an online shop like Etsy – globally
  • On an auction site like eBay – internationally
  • Other ways you can think of

If you are going to sell digital goods like patterns, eBooks or videos there is no choice, like above with your actual physical crochet hats and scarves, you will sell your digital products online and globally to an international market.

This means all of these types of items need to be very clear and use standard crochet terminology and easily understood by all.

Your Dream Customer has two facets

The thing is, who is your customer and more importantly where is your customer.

There are four areas in where your customers are found:

  • Locally – In your neighbourhood where you can walk, cycle, bus or take a cab to reach them and you sell face-to-face
  • Regionally – In your area around 200km tops and it takes a bus or car ride to get there and you sell face-to-face
  • Nationally – in your country – you send the goods by post in the mail
  • Internationally – Anywhere in the world and you send the goods by post in the mail

It depends again who they are:

  • Individuals
  • Businesses (shops and retailers)
  • Wholesalers (who buy in bulk and sell to retailers)

Examples of who is, and where to find, your dream customer

Your dream customer may:

  • Live in your neighbourhood
  • Live near regional craft shows where you have a stall
  • Live in your country and buys one item for personal use and to give to friends.
  • Live anywhere.  Likes your style, your goodies and your message.

It may take some time for you to decide who your dream customer is. But the benefits to you of this simple exercise are immense in saving time, money and effort. Not to mention the agonising over why things are not working if you are pitching to the wrong people or madly crocheting things that they don’t want.

“When you know who your customer is it tells you where to expend your creative and promotional effort.”

If you have an online store

There is no point making twenty winter hats if you live in a warm place unless you have an online store selling to cold areas like, north America, Canada or northern Europe and you sell winter hats all year round.

If you have an online store you can sell all items both physical and digital all the time.

If you sell locally or regionally

There is no point in stockpiling multiples of the same item if they are not selling.

Be aware of seasonal changes (summer and winter) and adjust your stock of made-up items to suit. Don’t carry winter hats through the summer if they sit on your shelves waiting to be bought and don’t carry summer lacy vests through the winter.

Rather have a sale in the spring (and move your winter hats) and a sale in the autumn (and move your summer tops)  and reduce them to a lower price. This will free up your cash so you can buy more yarn and make what is in demand in the next three months or so of summer. This is known as cashflow.

Some crocheters like to have made-up items of whatever their speciality is neatly folded and in plastic bags ready for shipping. Whilst this is good (to be organised so you can find thing when they do sell) it does not make sense to carry stock over the wrong season because you have money invested in these items.

These are some ideas to think about as you craft your next project. they are points I wish someone had told me way back when I started selling my crochet goods.

I hope you find them of use as you grow your own crochet micro-business by knowing your dream customer.


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